Fashionista https://www.updatemywardrobe.online Clothes Shoes and Designing Accesories for Women Gentlemen and Kids, Ropa Calzado y Accesorios de Moda para Damas Caballeros y Niños, Fashion Clothing Tue, 12 Nov 2019 15:15:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/cropped-cropped-Wardrobe-160-x-160-32x32.png Fashionista https://www.updatemywardrobe.online 32 32 127480589 Hip-hop to haute couture: dance’s love affair with fashion – The Guardian https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/hip-hop-to-haute-couture-dances-love-affair-with-fashion-the-guardian/ Tue, 12 Nov 2019 15:15:09 +0000 https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/hip-hop-to-haute-couture-dances-love-affair-with-fashion-the-guardian/ Dance Hip-hop to haute couture: dance’s love affair with fashion From the ballet performances like 17th century catwalk shows to Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw in a tutu, two exhibitions explore a stylish symbiotic [...]

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Hip-hop to haute couture: dance’s love affair with fashion

From the ballet performances like 17th century catwalk shows to Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw in a tutu, two exhibitions explore a stylish symbiotic relationship

Feeling pumped: a model in Schiaparelli haute couture




Feeling pumped: a model in Schiaparelli haute couture
Photograph: Jasper Abels

The shy bookseller played by Audrey Hepburn in 1957’s Funny Face wears couture versions of ballet pumps. The actor had been a dancer, and the movie’s couture costumes, designed by Hubert de Givenchy, climax in a wedding dress (for Hepburn’s marriage to a fashion photographer played by an elderly Fred Astaire) with a full ballerina skirt. So beautiful were the designs that they sprang out of the film and inspired style on the street. Everybody could afford a pair of pumps, even if they didn’t look like Hepburn while wearing them.

Sarah Jessica Parker as Carrie Bradshaw during the filming of Sex in the City in New York in 1998.


Sarah Jessica Parker as Carrie Bradshaw during the filming of Sex in the City. Photograph: Rex

The opening sequence from Sex and the City also drew inspiration from ballet. Sarah Jessica Parker’s swirl of tulle was both a homage to dance and a copiable fashion statement. That simple tutu conjured a world of romance located in the historic iconography of ballet – and was speedily undercut when a New York City bus steered into a puddle, splashing our heroine.

Dior’s creative director, Maria Grazia Chiuri, brought dance and fashion together in her 2019 spring/summer ready-to-wear collection. The show was trailed by a video of a performance created by the Israeli hotshot choreographer Sharon Eyal with the caption “the story comes from inside the body”. The unveiling of the collection was accompanied by famous quotations about dance, including Isadora Duncan’s contention that “Dance is the movement of the universe concentrated in an individual.”

But it is hip-hop and street dance and its high and low brand aesthetic that has arguably influenced general culture more than any other dance trend since the thrilling arrival of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in Paris in 1910 sparked a sensation. Stars such as Nijinsky and Tamara Karsavina transformed ballet into a thrilling vehicle for transmitting avant-garde ideas, and the lavish, exotic designs of Alexander Benois, Leon Bakst and Natalia Goncharova offered an entry into a more exciting world.

from Christian Dior’s spring/summer 2019 show.


‘The story comes from inside the body’ … from Christian Dior’s spring/summer 2019 show. Photograph: Jasper Abels

“They brought colours and fabrics from Russia that people didn’t know,” says Madelief Hohé, curator of Let’s Dance, an exhibition on fashion in dance “from tutus to sneakers” at the Kunstmuseum in The Hague. “Everybody was wearing grey and beige and pink, and then Goncharova arrives with costumes in golds and dark blues and turquoises in striking combinations that just hadn’t been used before.”

Natalia Goncharova, costume for a squid in Sadko, 1916, danced by the Ballets Russes.


Cutting edge … one of Natalia Goncharova’s costumes Ballets Russes. Photograph: Allard Pierson/University of Amsterdam

Goncharova’s involvement in Ballets Russes was part of Diaghilev’s cultivation of innovation in all aspects of the company’s work, from the music to the choreography to the design. Dance’s ability to position itself on the cutting edge of culture is one reason it has such a close relationship to the clothes we wear. The dance crazes of the tango and charleston expressed a new sense of freedom after the first world war. “With their beads and their fringes women’s clothes were designed to be at their most beautiful when women were dancing,” says Hohé. “In the same way, when the rock’n’roll dance craze began in the 1950s, skirts grew bigger and stockings were replaced with pantyhose because women were moving and showing their legs more.”

The liberated grace of Duncan and her loose, classical clothes inspired Mariano Fortuny’s 1920s experiments with pleats; the elegance of Astaire and Ginger Rogers encouraged designers to market the same kind of sophisticated dresses to their customers; the energetic kids from Fame in the 1980s put an entire generation in legwarmers, while hip-hop music did the same for trainers.

Woolly jumpers … the kids from 1980’s film Fame take legwarmers out into the streets.


Woolly jumpers … the kids from 1980’s film Fame take legwarmers out into the streets. Photograph: MGM/Kobal/Rex/Shutterstock

But Hohé argues that the relationship between dance and fashion run deeper, suggesting that the elaborate dances of the 17th-century French court – which were the origins of ballet – are the equivalent of today’s couture catwalk shows. “If you wanted to design something spectacular and new, you designed it for the ballet, to be performed in front of the king.”

Designers have always wanted to show off their wares on the dance stage. In 1928, Coco Chanel designed for Diaghilev, creating costumes for Bronislava Nijinska’s Le Train Bleu that evoked the life of the young and fashionable on the French Riviera in all their sporty glory. Her costumes for Apollo, George Balanchine’s first collaboration with Stravinsky, were daring in the short, pleated cut of the tunics, unlike anything seen on stage before.

The ballet costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo, the Sun God in Ballet Royal de la Nuit in the exhibition at the Kunstmuseum in The Hague.


The ballet costume worn by Louis XIV as Apollo, the Sun God in Ballet Royal de la Nuit in the exhibition at the Kunstmuseum in The Hague. Photograph: Hollandse Hoogte/Lebrecht Music & Arts

How designers have created designs for ballet is scrutinised in a forthcoming exhibition. Couturiers de la Danse at the National Centre of Stage Costume in Moulins, France, examines the contribution designers have made to the look of ballet and its relationship to the modern world. “[Ballet] is a kind of laboratory for the designer and choreographer alike,” says curator Philippe Noisette. “They exchange ideas through this medium. For the designer, it’s like having a blank sheet of paper. Every idea is possible. The only thing is that in the end, the costume is alive.” Choreographers, in turn, have been inspired by the designs offered them.

Clothes for dancing in have to be practical, however. Designers know this but can get carried away. Both exhibitions feature the tutus designed by Viktor & Rolf for Dutch National Ballet in 2014 – square, sheared on one side, they challenged the eye of the viewer, accustomed to seeing the graceful circle of the traditional outfit, as well as the male dancers who risked cutting themselves on the costumes’ sharp edges as they partnered the ballerinas. “A solution had to be found,” says Hohé – in this case by the choreographer Jorma Elo, who created steps that could work around the problem.

When Jean Paul Gaultier, who forged a close, fruitful creative relationship with the French choreographer Régine Chopinot, wanted to make a design like a second skin, with the entire body covered head to toe by one single piece of clothing, he was forced to rethink his concept. “The eye and nose holes were really small and there was not enough space for the dancer to breathe,” Noisette explains. “He had to redesign it and make it more wearable.”

Some collaborations, Noisette acknowledges, are superficial. But the results of those that really work can be electric and revelatory. Issey Miyake created 200 costumes of staggering, beautiful intensity for the choreographer William Forsythe’s 1991 work The Loss of Small Detail. Forsythe told Noisette: “Issey and I exchanged all kinds of images, literature, photography and poems. Then he came to Frankfurt with several assistants and garbage bags full of the most extraordinary designs imaginable. Actually, they were unimaginable. No one had ever produced forms of that kind with fabric.” This was a time when Miyake was experimenting with what became his signature pleats. Noisette says: “I think he used the dance world to make those designs really practical and alive. It became a trend throughout his life.”

Natalia Osipova in Medusa by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui at the Royal Opera House, London, with costumes by Olivia Pomp


Mythical touch … Natalia Osipova in Medusa by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui at the Royal Opera House, London, with costumes by Olivia Pomp. Photograph: Tristram Kenton/The Guardian

Stylist and fashion editor Olivia Pomp, who designed the costumes for the Royal Ballet’s recent piece Medusa, choreographed by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, points out, however, that the aims of the two forms are not synonymous. “Ultimately fashion is a business about creating sales for the next new thing. Dance is a completely different story. The best dance costumes are made for longevity by people who understand the body, space and movement.”

That’s why, Pomp says, the designs produced by the Bauhaus thinker Oskar Schlemmer have stood the test of time when other, more transient and initially fashionable creations now look old hat. “He was way ahead of his time. One hundred years later, his designs still work because they were never narrowly fashionable. That’s the danger when you get designers working in dance: you need someone who has a real sense of style, rather than someone who is just trying to be fashionable.”

Let’s Dance! Fashion in Dance, from Tutus to Sneakers is at the Kunstmuseum, The Hague, until 12 January; Couturiers de la Danse is at the National Centre for Stage Costume, Moulins, France, from 30 November to 3 May

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Pampas Grass Wreath DIY https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/pampas-grass-wreath-diy/ Tue, 12 Nov 2019 15:15:04 +0000 https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/pampas-grass-wreath-diy/ Have you jumped on board the dried grasses trend yet? I’m 100% here for it and couldn’t wait to make my own pampas grass wreath for this fall season. It’s as easy as you’d imagine [...]

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Have you jumped on board the dried grasses trend yet? I’m 100% here for it and couldn’t wait to make my own pampas grass wreath for this fall season. It’s as easy as you’d imagine to put one together and there are just as many ways to customize your own according to your minimalist, maximalist, bohemian, or farmhouse needs.

I first got to work on a 12″ hoop before realizing my finished piece would fan out to a size no longer conducive to opening and closing a standard-sized front door. Ha! So, use a 10″ hoop for a large wreath that will still work on a single door and a larger hoop if you’re wanting to use it on a wall and have a bit more space to fill. I love the texture and simplicity of pampas grass and it’s perfect for the fall and harvest season home decor.

Supplies
-15 or more pampas grass stalk heads of similar size (similar to these)
10″ metal hoop
-floral wire or 24″ gauge wire
-wire cutters
-scissors
-aerosol hair spray (to keep it from shedding)
-silk or cotton ribbon

Note: There are many varieties of pampas grass available for purchase online. Some are fluffier than others so keep that in mind when ordering. The pampas grass I used was about 3″-4″ wide at the widest point and about 14″ of plume each. If you’re lucky enough to know someone that has a pampas grass bush growing on their property, see if they’ll let you prune it. Win-win!

Step One: Before getting started on your wreath, you’ll want to generously spray your pampas grass plumes with aerosol hair spray to keep them from shedding bits of seed all over your floors. Do so in a well ventilated place and let them dry before handling them.

Next, trim your pampas grass stem so that you have a 3″-4″ stalk. Cut 2′ or so of wire and wrap it around the first stalk several times close to the bottom of the plume. Then wrap it around both the stalk and the hoop several times to secure it.

Step Two: Cut the second stalk and lay it over the first stalk. If you tuck the bottom of the second stalk just under the hoop, it will stay in place much better than just laying it on the top of the hoop. Wrap your wire a few times around the stalk and hoop together.

Step Three: Continue placing your next stalk over the previous stalk so that the stalks are covered up by the plumes. Once you run out of wire, cut another 2′ length (for ease of use) and twist it together with the end of your previous wire before continuing on.

Step Four: Continue adding so that there is no gap left in the wreath. You may have to lift up the first plume to attach the last plume to the hoop. Then gently fluff the sprayed plumes on the areas around the inner part of the hoop to ensure they cover the stalks and wire. Attach a 4″ length of wire around the hoop and twist the ends together to make a loop. This will be your hanger.

You can announce it finished or you can add another layer of dried grasses, flowers, ribbons, etc., to add a little more flair or you can enjoy it in its simplicity. I added a folded length of ochre colored cotton cord to mine. The perfect shade of golden yellow, I think!

It’s a perfectly delicious wreath for the kitchen, dining room, or front door. It satisfies my attraction to natural, organic materials, but will save well for next year, too.

Umm … did you know that pink pampas grass is a thing? I used to think it was all just spray painted or dyed somehow, but it grows that way! Soft pink and orange and white pumpkins would be really pretty together, wouldn’t they? Enjoy! -Rachel

Credits//Author and Photography: Rachel Denbow. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

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People’s Choice Awards 2019: Best fashion on the red carpet – CNN https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/peoples-choice-awards-2019-best-fashion-on-the-red-carpet-cnn/ Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:13:53 +0000 https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/peoples-choice-awards-2019-best-fashion-on-the-red-carpet-cnn/ Written by CNN Staff The People’s Choice Awards may serve to celebrate the year’s achievements in film, TV and music, but there was also plenty happening in the fashion stakes Sunday evening. In addition to [...]

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Written by CNN Staff

The People’s Choice Awards may serve to celebrate the year’s achievements in film, TV and music, but there was also plenty happening in the fashion stakes Sunday evening.

In addition to the usual glamor of the red carpet, a Fashion Icon Award was awarded for only the second year. And with 2019’s winner, Gwen Stefani, announced in advance, all eyes were on the singer as the stars arrived at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica.

True to form, Stefani turned up in dramatic fashion in a white Vera Wang dress with a huge, ruffled train reading “Fashion Icon.” She paired the gown with thigh-high boots and long black gloves, before posing on the red carpet with partner and fellow “The Voice” judge Blake Shelton.

Fittingly, her award was presented by fashion design Jeremy Scott, who himself seemed out to make a statement. In what was perhaps the night’s boldest outfit, Moschino’s creative director sported an open blazer, revealing leather straps across his chest, that he matched with a silky red cape (and yet more leather straps creeping up the legs of his pinstripe trousers).

Jeremy Scott arrives ahead of the ceremony in Santa Monica, California.

Jeremy Scott arrives ahead of the ceremony in Santa Monica, California. Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Elsewhere, the red carpet’s male stars largely opted for classic tailoring, though not without a hearty dose of color — from “Riverdale” actor KJ Apa’s fetching pink suit to “Vanderpump Rules” star James Kennedy’s mustard jacket. Yet, some of the most eye-catching suits and jackets were worn by the evening’s female power-dressers, with Kourtney Kardashian, Pink, Victoria Park, Erika Jayne and Candice Patton all putting their own spin on the blazer.

Related video: A brief history of the red carpet

There were also plenty of bare shoulders on display. “Euphoria” star Zendaya continued her run of form on the red carpet in a black one-shouldered Christopher Esber gown, while actress Joey King and Canadian singer Alessia Cara both impressed in strapless numbers.

But on what was a relatively unadventurous night for fashion, it fell to Zendaya’s co-star, Storm Reid, to set social media alight. The 16-year-old actress stole the show in a sculptural electric blue dress by Dutch designer Iris van Herpen.

Scroll through the gallery above to see more looks from the red carpet. CNN’s Oscar Holland, Hilary Whiteman and Will Lanzoni contributed to this report.

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Duke Fashion Exchange wants students to express creativity through fashion – Duke Chronicle https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/duke-fashion-exchange-wants-students-to-express-creativity-through-fashion-duke-chronicle/ Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:13:52 +0000 https://www.updatemywardrobe.online/duke-fashion-exchange-wants-students-to-express-creativity-through-fashion-duke-chronicle/ Sweatpants, flip flopsand an oversized logo t-shirt: the classic outfit of choice for your typical college student. Right?  This campus, however, dispels all notions of the “college” stereotype. Five minutes of people-watching in West Union, [...]

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Sweatpants, flip flopsand an oversized logo t-shirt: the classic outfit of choice for your typical college student. Right? 

This campus, however, dispels all notions of the “college” stereotype. Five minutes of people-watching in West Union, and you’ll see that Duke students aren’t afraid to express their personality with their clothing. Furthermore, there’s a huge diversity in how style manifests itself among the student community.

Duke Fashion Exchange (DFX) provides students a welcoming community for engaging in conversations about style and fashion. DFX seeks to promote personal expression to the undergraduate student population alongside principles of sustainability and affordability. 

In recent years, sustainability has become something of a buzzword in the fashion community. Even the fast-fashion retail chain H&M has faced controversy over allegedly burning unsold clothes while simultaneously advertising its eco-conscious brand under vague initiatives. Brands may promote their goods under the guise of sustainability in the hopes that their consumers aren’t dissuaded from repurchasing, but on campus, DFX offers a more organic means of sustainability. Its creative and innovative community allows fashion to progress in a fun, affordable and sustainable way, showing that you don’t have to come straight from the mall to look good.

The Chronicle had the chance to speak to several board members of DFX about the message and goals of the organization. The interviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.


Abby Zhang is a junior and the current president of DFX. This is her third year on the board.

The Chronicle: What is Duke’s fashion community like?

Abby Zhang: Personally, I always see people wearing really cute outfits on campus, and I really enjoy it, but there’s not a huge established community around fashion. That’s what I want DFX to provide. Our mission is all about encouraging people to be creative with fashion.

TC: How does DFX incorporate the aspects of cost and sustainability into its projects?

AZ: Sustainability and affordability are two huge tenets of our club. Every single event that we do, we try to make sure that we keep those in mind. You don’t have to spend a ton of money to be creative.

TC: What makes the exchange event worth participating in?

AZ: It’s my favorite event of the semester because it’s a win for everyone — sellers can earn some pocket cash for cleaning out their closet, other students get great deals on really cute clothes, perfectly good clothing pieces get new life and everyone gets free food! It’s seriously so much fun and we’re really excited to put it on other year.

TC: Do you have any stories behind any items you’ve bought or sold through DFX?

AZ: All of our events are for the general student population. We’ll have a seller sign-up list; anyone who wants to sell their clothes can sign up and then we usually take them first come, first serve. The students determine the prices of the clothes, and they tend to sell their clothes at a pretty low price, usually five to 12 dollars. You can definitely catch me wearing something I bought from DFX. It’s really satisfying to get a good deal — I’ve gotten a cardigan for $5 once.

Annie Wang is a first-year and programming co-chair for DFX. 

The Chronicle: Can you give your impression of Duke’s style atmosphere?

Annie Wang: I was really impressed when I came here, especially looking at all the upperclassmen just walking around on campus. So many of them look super put together, and I feel like people here put a lot of effort into everything including their appearance, which I really appreciate. There are a lot of students here who are really passionate about expressing themselves through their clothing.

TC: Do you have any tips for being fashionable on a budget?

AW: One tip is that you can reuse different pieces for different purposes: for example, I have this dress that looks kinda ‘meh’ as a dress, but when you tuck it into pants, it looks really cool. Also, if I go thrifting, I also look in the men’s section — you don’t need to be restricted by labels. 

DFX has an upcoming exchange event Nov. 22 from 5 to 7 p.m. In addition, DFX regularly hosts various other events throughout the year that focus on  refashioning old clothing, including embroidery, upcycle painting and thrifting excursions.

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